Stranger Things: why brands love to piggyback on the show

Netflix has promotional agreements with 75 different brands for season three of the show. Why do they like it so much? Netflix and the Duffer Brothers are up against it. In Stranger Things, they have managed to create a juggernaut that satisfies critics and fans in equal measure. But, at the same time, the show comes with its own form of inbuilt obsolescence. This isnt a series designed to run for ever because, short of forcing them into a nightmarish round of age-denying cosmetic surgery, the cast will reach adulthood before long. The current prediction is that Stranger Things will check out after four five seasons. The third season becomes available this week. This means that Netflix only has a …

John Oliver on Amazon: ‘A system that squeezes people lowest on the ladder’

The Last Week Tonight host discussed the relentless pace of the warehousing industry and the many dangers that workers face John Oliver has spoken out about the brutal conditions that many warehouse workers face, focusing specifically on Amazon. On his HBO show Last Week Tonight, the comic started by referring to e-commerce as being like regular commerce only no one calls the police when you do it naked. He then spoke about the way that our idea of shopping has changed, and what this has meant for retail employees who no longer have brick-and-mortar stores to work at. Its as if warehouses are absorbing Americas lost retail employees, which initially sounds kind of nice doesnt it? he said. Its a …

Alyssa Milano calls for sex strike as protest over Republican abortion laws

Actor provokes storm with call to regain bodily autonomy as GOP-held legislatures push laws amid quest to overturn Roe v Wade The actor Alyssa Milano ignited a social media storm with a call for women to join her in a sex strike, to protest against cardiac activity is detected Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

There are no black people on GoT: why is fantasy TV so white?

The genre has a problem with diversity, and George RR Martins series is no exception, but some feel its omissions reflect reality This month, the biggest TV show in the world returns for one final dragon-slaying, wall-toppling, throne-nabbing season. In the time since it last aired, memes have been shared, elaborate theories have been devised and revised, bets have been laid (Lyanna Mormont FTW) and cos-play outfits have been lovingly stitched. Yet there is one aspect that is yet to receive adequate attention: George RR Martins skewed spin on medieval Britain and the west, where the fair-haired, fair-skinned Lannisters engaged in a generations-long power struggle with the darker-haired, fair-skinned Starks. People of colour were not absent from the show but …