The greatest photos ever? Why the moon landing shots are artistic masterpieces

From a spacesuited everyman to a golden-legged invader, the lunar images were astonishingly poetic works of art that captured humanity evolving before our very eyes. Can they ever be surpassed? Fifty years ago this week, a former navy pilot created one of the most revolutionary artistic masterpieces of the 20th century, one we have yet to fully assimilate. His name was Apollo 11 crewmate Nasas astronauts and photography a passion that altered human consciousness for ever. It all started when John Glenn walked into a store in Cocoa Beach, Florida, at the start of the 1960s. Glenn, one of Nasas original team of seven astronauts selected from the test pilot elite, was getting ready for Americas first attempt to put …

Stranger Things: why brands love to piggyback on the show

Netflix has promotional agreements with 75 different brands for season three of the show. Why do they like it so much? Netflix and the Duffer Brothers are up against it. In Stranger Things, they have managed to create a juggernaut that satisfies critics and fans in equal measure. But, at the same time, the show comes with its own form of inbuilt obsolescence. This isnt a series designed to run for ever because, short of forcing them into a nightmarish round of age-denying cosmetic surgery, the cast will reach adulthood before long. The current prediction is that Stranger Things will check out after four five seasons. The third season becomes available this week. This means that Netflix only has a …

John Oliver on Amazon: ‘A system that squeezes people lowest on the ladder’

The Last Week Tonight host discussed the relentless pace of the warehousing industry and the many dangers that workers face John Oliver has spoken out about the brutal conditions that many warehouse workers face, focusing specifically on Amazon. On his HBO show Last Week Tonight, the comic started by referring to e-commerce as being like regular commerce only no one calls the police when you do it naked. He then spoke about the way that our idea of shopping has changed, and what this has meant for retail employees who no longer have brick-and-mortar stores to work at. Its as if warehouses are absorbing Americas lost retail employees, which initially sounds kind of nice doesnt it? he said. Its a …

We worship the body: India’s kushti mud wrestlers a photo essay

Caste and religion are left at the door of Indias traditional wrestling academies, where the pursuit of physical grace and brute force is a pathway out of poverty By day Amol Patil, 23, is a security guard, standing in a sentry box outside a company office in Mumbai, his limbs coiled inside a polyester uniform. By evening, when he enters the hallowed square of the clay pit, he is released in a blaze of brute force. Patil is a wrestler of the traditional Indian school of mud-clay wrestling called kushti which dates back to the Mughals and is passed down from generation to generation. Kushti is practiced in an akhara, or wrestling academy, where everything is governed by strict rules …

Rebecca Solnit: ‘Every protest shifts the world’s balance’

Two hundred years after the Peterloo massacre, which led to the founding of the Manchester Guardian, protest is shaping our political moment. Where do we go from here? Scale it up and its revolution; scale it down and its individual non-cooperation that may be seen as nothing more than obstinacy or malingering or not seen at all. What we call protest identifies one aspect of popular power and resistance, a force so woven into history and everyday life that you miss a lot of its impact if you focus only on groups of people taking stands in public places. But people taking such stands have changed the world over and over, toppled regimes, won rights, terrified tyrants, stopped pipelines and …

‘You stole my cheese!’: the seven best Post-it note wars

From workplace food fights to disputes with the neighbours, the humble yellow sticky note comes into its own In Sydney and London, two communities are at war. Both alike in dignity one, an office of journalists, the other a residential Brixton street and bound together by the humble Post-it note. In Sydney, the offices of SBS (Special Broadcasting Service) have been torn apart by one persons quest to protect their cheese. In London, the issue of communal flowers has sparked a passive-aggressive neighbourhood row. In honour of these two, Guardian Australia has compiled our list of the best Post-it note wars. And please, go ahead and tell us your best passive-aggressive note experience in the comments below. The SBS cheese …

Bruce Springsteen’s albums ranked!

Ahead of the release of the Bosss latest album, Western Stars, we rate all 18 of his studio albums to date 18. High Hopes (2014) Old songs, covers, revivals of old covers. It seemed as though, on his 18th studio album, Bruce Springsteen was, for the first time, casting around for inspiration. Its not bad no Springsteen album is genuinely bad but it did seem more of a shrug than a statement. 17. Lucky Town (1992) In 1989, Springsteen dissolved the E Street Band and moved to California to start anew. That shift took form in two simultaneous albums, neither of which were strong enough on their own. This was the rockier one, and on Leap of Faith offered Springsteens …

The therapy dogs that helped the Parkland survivors got their own yearbook page, and yes, we’re crying.

After the devastating Marjorie Stoneman High School shooting in Parkland, Florida that left 17 people dead, a number students and faculty experienced debilitating symptoms that often accompany a traumatic event. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can take many forms, affecting both the body and mind years after the inciting incident. There are several forms of therapy that have been proven helpful for those living with it, but one that brought a great deal of comfort to the Parkland students involved 14 adorable, four-legged friends. These therapy dogs have been a staple at Marjorie Stoneman High School ever since the shooting, acting as non-intrusive, comforting, mobile support systems that students can turn to whenever they need. The students have dealt with …

The Hustle review Anne Hathaway kills the comedy in dire scam caper

A gender-switch reboot of Dirty Rotten Scoundrels co-starring Rebel Wilson is catastrophically unfunny ADirty Rotten Scoundrels (1988), which starred Michael Caine as a smooth Brit swindling rich suckers in the south of France, and Steve Martin as his rackety American rival-slash-partner. Now its Hathaway playing Josephine, the scam maestro with the couture outfits and the supposedly posh English accent. (Surely she will be finally unmasked as American, and there will be a point to how annoyingly fake that voice is? Surely?) And Les Misrables with her teeth falling out. Were dreaming a dream of non-hilarity, although, to be entirely fair, the screenwriters arent helping her with material about how to pronounce the word Phuket. The incredible thing is that the …

Feel like your vacations aren’t as fabulous as your friends’? This study is for you.

People love to talk about their amazing vacations, but research shows that many of them are lying. Ever feel like those Instagram and Facebook posts of picture-perfect places and epically awesome experiences may not be telling the whole story? You’re probably right. Research conducted by flight-comparison site JetCost.com found that a good portion of Americans are blatantly dishonest about their vacations. Of 4000 people surveyed, a full two-thirds admitted to lying about some aspect of their trips, mostly about weather, accommodations, and the number of attractions they visited, TravelPulse reported. About a quarter of Americans also lied about the amount of alcohol they consumed, and 21% lied about how much money they spent while traveling. In perhaps the most telling …

Why we are addicted to conspiracy theories

The long read: Outsiders and the disenfranchised have always embraced the existence of wild plots and cover-ups. But now the biggest conspiracy-mongers are in charge In January 2015, I spent the longest, queasiest week of my life on a cruise ship filled with conspiracy theorists. As our boat rattled toward Mexico and back, I heard about every wild plot, secret plan and dark cover-up imaginable. It was mostly fascinating, occasionally exasperating and the cause of a headache that took months to fade. To my pleasant surprise, given that I was a reporter travelling among a group of deeply suspicious people, I was accused of working for the CIA only once. The unshakeable certainty possessed by many of the conspiracy theorists …

People are slamming famous punk rocker for complaining about the homeless. But he’s got a good reason.

Homeless people  in Venice Beach by Malingering / Flickr Los Angeles is experiencing a homelessness epidemic with the number of unhoused people rising 75% over the past six years. About 54,000 of the city’s four million residents are currently experiencing homelessness and the root cause is the city’s lack of affordable housing. According to LAist, since 2000, renter incomes have decreased by 3% while rents have gone up 32%. The city recently created a quarter-cent increase in its sales tax to fund programs to help house these residents, but encampments are still popping up throughout the city. Venice Beach, a swanky West L.A. neighborhood famous for its eccentric residents, has seen one of the largest increases in unhoused people. Shell …

Beetlejuice review fun, freaky Tim Burton adaptation haunts Broadway

A stage transfer for the spirited 80s comedy struggles to produce any memorable songs but provides an enjoyably silly night out nonetheless A specter is haunting the Winter Garden. Actually, a lot of specters. There are dead football players, a slit-wrist beauty queen, a sandworm, a singing roast pig, a couple of garden-variety friendly ghosts and of course Beetlejuice himself, the zoot-suited, fright-wigged, sour milk-complected ghoul at the whirling center of Beetlejuice, a demented, borderline incoherent, often rousing new musical. The specter of capitalism? Thats there, too. The merch booth is going gangbusters. As a movie to adapt into a big-bucks Broadway musical, Tim Burtons Beetlejuice, which made a bundle for Warner Brothers in 1988, is a weird choice, not …

We, the Survivors by Tash Aw review murder in a world of injustice

A fearful young man carries out a seemingly random crime in this gripping and strangely moving novel From the very first page of Albert Camuss The Outsider is an almost palpable presence. The detached tone of Aws first-person narrator, Ah Hock; the fleeting impressions of societal contradiction and injustice that govern his life; the catalytic presence of a supposed friend and petty criminal, Keong; and, most of all, the fact that Ah Hock seems recently to have committed a random murder make him a close cousin to Camuss feckless, emotionally stunted Meursault, whose own drift into senseless killing provided the model for the existential antihero of the 1950s and 60s. There is even a racial element to both crimes: Meursault …

A high school principal created a dress code for parents. It’s being called racist and sexist.

Parents whose children attend James Madison High School were taken aback when they received a letter from Principal Carlotta Outley Brown outlining a strict dress code they needed to adhere to while on school grounds. “We are preparing your child for a prosperous future,” Brown wrote. “We want them to know what is appropriate and what is not appropriate for any setting they may be in.” The list of banned items was pretty extensive. It included satin caps, bonnets, shower caps, hair rollers, pajamas or any pajama-looking attire, jeans “torn from your buttocks to all the way down showing lots of skin,” leggings “showing your bottom and where your body is not covered from the front or back,” very low …

There are no black people on GoT: why is fantasy TV so white?

The genre has a problem with diversity, and George RR Martins series is no exception, but some feel its omissions reflect reality This month, the biggest TV show in the world returns for one final dragon-slaying, wall-toppling, throne-nabbing season. In the time since it last aired, memes have been shared, elaborate theories have been devised and revised, bets have been laid (Lyanna Mormont FTW) and cos-play outfits have been lovingly stitched. Yet there is one aspect that is yet to receive adequate attention: George RR Martins skewed spin on medieval Britain and the west, where the fair-haired, fair-skinned Lannisters engaged in a generations-long power struggle with the darker-haired, fair-skinned Starks. People of colour were not absent from the show but …